Th1 and Th2 domination in autoimmunology – the arms of the immune system.

Awareness of the type of dominance of the arms of the immune system is one of the most important things on the way being put into remission in autoimmune diseases. Thanks to this knowledge, we are able to adjust the appropriate supplements and type of training that will fit the case and will work in the patient’s favor.

Th1 dominance is characterized by the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and thus increased inflammation, while Th2 dominance will be accompanied by increased secretion of antibodies. Th2 dominance will result in a reduction in the overall level of inflammation in the body.

Each type of domination is characterized by special symptoms, and usually, specific disease entities run with a specific type of Th dominance.

Th1 domination is usually present in:

* Hashimoto’s disease
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Alzheimer’s disease
* Irritable bowel syndrome (also in Th2 dominance)
* Delayed food intolerances like IgG
* Inflammatory bowel diseases
* Psoriasis
* Multiple sclerosis

and many more.

Th2 domination is correlated with:

* Asthma
* Allergies, hay fewer (including seasonal allergies)
* Eczema
* IgE food allergy
* Autism
* Chronic fatigue syndrome
* Sjogren’s syndrome
* Histamine intolerance

and many more.

Diagnosis of domination can make the implemented diet, training and supplementation, as well as changes in lifestyle will be more effective. It will shorten this treatment and prevent loss of money and time. Due to the different prevalence of dominance, however, supplementation without the diagnosis of the arms of the immune system is not recommended, as it may contribute to the deterioration of the patient’s condition.

What will lower the Th1 arm:

* omega 3
* Vitamin A
* Turmeric (preferably in the morning)
* Resveratrol
* Berberine
* Lithium
* Cats claw
* Hemp oils (including CBD and THC)
* Black cumin ♥ ️
* Aloe
* Caffeine
* Vitamin D3!
* LDN (there will be a whole separate post about it

When it comes to food, which I will help in the domination of Th1:

* Rice
*Oils: olive oil (cold pressed!), Avocado, sesame, fish (eg Tran of good quality), black cumin
* Soy
* An avocado
* Pineapple
* Papain
* Watermelon
* Apples
* Egg protein (say research, but note! – they do not take into account food hypersensitivity type IgG which in the domination of Th1 occur extremely often)
* Karob
* Mustard

Lifestyle:

* The most important always and everywhere, the number 1 when it comes to lifestyle: RHYTHM DOSE!
* Posts, Intermittent fasting
* Acupuncture
* Daylight / UVB

When it comes to food, which I will help in the domination of Th2:

* low lecithin food
* kiwi
* cocoa (only if there is no allergy!)
* black cumin and black cumin oil
* coffee
* broccoli sprouts (also very helpful in chronic Lyme disease!)
* products of bee origin
* proper mineralization and content of vitamins in the diet

Lifestyle:

* interval exercises
* ice cold baths, cold exposure
* sex, love (generally anything that will cause oxytocin secretion)
* exposure to light

supplements:

* Resveratrol (eg from red wine)
* Lycopene (found for example in tomatoes)
* Spirulina
* Oregano oil
* Ashwaganda (carefully with problems with the digestive tract)
* Colostrum
* Kurkumina / turmeric

What should be especially observed in the domination of Th2:

* Alcohol
* Soy
* MCT oil (!)
* Papaina / papaya
* too high doses of vitamin d3
* magnesium deficiency
* BPA (plastic, for example, in my case plastic discontinuation basically settled the matter of Th2 dominance)

In summary, which of the above can be used without a detailed diagnosis, because the studies showed positive effects in both # Th1 and # Th2 dominance (before use, consult your doctor):

* eliminating or reducing the use of plastic
* regulation of the daily cycle, exposure to daylight
* black cumin oil
* resveratrol
* turmeric // curcumin
* omega 3.



Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20586818

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11812015

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22898493

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12839120

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8106745

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651166

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11261793

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15162133

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1810449/…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23285134

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20622114

https://www.sciencedirect.com/…/pii/S0378874111004387

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3642442/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233107

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15258190

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12446015

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19879252

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633636/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16380673

https://link.springer.com/art…/10.1007%2Fs10517-012-1584-0

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/…/bpb/29/6/29_6_1148/_article

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18520337

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11261793

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2269703/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21520494

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504646/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10541049

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19764067

https://www.thieme-connect.com/…/10.1055/s-2005-869672

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17466913

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC119893/

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2012/893023/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10447774

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/…/www…/pmc/articles/PMC3671179/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19059494

https://www.iasj.net/iasj?func=fulltext&aId=51636

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1810449/…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16603328

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15683853

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1810449/…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16937495

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3821880/…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15857205

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15857205

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15683853

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12789239

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3686562/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563838/…

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20210607

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18520337

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20383177


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

1 + 6 =